Green Film Network: Saving Mes Aynak, A Love Letter to Afghan People & THeir Culture

A recent photo of Mes Aynak, taken in June 2015. This massive site, equal in size to Pompeii and Machu Picchu, is already re-writing the history of Afghanistan and Buddhism. 90% of the site remains unexcavated, and if plans to mine at the site continue as currently constructed, all of this history will be lost forever.  

A recent photo of Mes Aynak, taken in June 2015. This massive site, equal in size to Pompeii and Machu Picchu, is already re-writing the history of Afghanistan and Buddhism. 90% of the site remains unexcavated, and if plans to mine at the site continue as currently constructed, all of this history will be lost forever.  

Writer Valentina Tibaldi of Habitat wrote a powerful article about Saving Mes Aynak for the Green Film Network. Thank you to Valentina for her support, and for helping share the message of Mes Aynak: 

A denunciation shouted to the world, a fight against time in order to save Mes Aynak, a 5,000-year-old archaeological site in Afghanistan. A symbol of cultural identity of priceless historical value, this place is threatened to be destructed to make place for a Chinese open pit copper mine.

Saving Mes Aynak, a documentary by the filmmaker, writer and journalist Brent E. Huffman, shows all this and much more. Awarded with the International One-Hour Film Prize at CinemAmbiente 2015, member of the Green Film Network, the movie tells the story of the Afghan archeologist Qadir Temori: with a group of fellow archeologists, he faces what seems an impossible battle against the Chinese, the Taliban and local politics to save their cultural heritage from forthcoming erasure.

Click here to read the full article